Beware of the home hunting burn out

House hunting can be a grind. If you’re not careful, it can easily take both an emotional and physical toll on you. At the beginning, you and your family will be fueled by excitement, desire and enthusiasm – the raw ingredients of adrenaline. That's what keeps you going. After a while, however, a long day of viewing homes with fidgety kids and an empty stomach can leave you exhausted. When that happens, even the most ideal home can seem undesirable. Since you don't want exhaustion to result in a missed opportunity, it's important to pace yourself. Here are some tips for doing just that.

 

When it comes to endurance, everyone has their limits. If a child or spouse is looking tired, take a break. Just because one person is able to see a lot of homes in quick succession doesn't mean everyone else in the family will have the same stamina.

 

    • Never house shop on an empty stomach. Make sure everyone has a good breakfast, lunch, or dinner before heading out.
    • If you have young children, find out where the local parks and playgrounds are located. These are great places to take a break and let the kids play for a while.
    • Keep some bottled water and perhaps some light snacks in the car. You never know when someone's stomach will begin to grumble.
    • During an all-day excursion, avoid the temptation to eat a large lunch at a restaurant. It may make you feel sluggish and tired in the afternoon.

If you've been house hunting for several weeks, all the homes may start to look alike. If this happens, take a few days off. It will help to restore your perspective.

Consider Buying a home with Some “Undesirable” Features

When you’re looking for a home, chances are, you have a checklist of things you want. Two bathrooms…a finished basement…a great looking kitchen…an expansive deck…But what happens when a home you see has a feature that doesn’t quite measure up? Perhaps the basement is poorly renovated. Or the kitchen is small. Or there’s only one bathroom.

 

Should you say “No”?

 

Here’s something to consider: A home that has a few undesirable features will probably cost less. And, those savings may more than cover the costs of any needed upgrades or renovations. So don’t pass up on a house simply because it doesn’t meet all your criteria. It may be worth buying a home for less and then making improvements.

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